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Home Blog German Shephed Dog Lover Eye Problems in German Shepherds | Causes, Symptoms, Treatment | Chronic Superficial Keratitis

Eye Problems in German Shepherds | Causes, Symptoms, Treatment | Chronic Superficial Keratitis

Posted by German Shephed Dog Lover
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on Friday, 13 April 2012 in German Shepherd News

The condition of “pannus cataract”, medically known as Chronic Superficial Keratitis, is a disease affecting the eyes and vision of your German Shepherd dog. This condition is particularly common among German Shepherd dogs, given its causes, which lie in genetics rather than as a result of behavior or upbringing, although these latter elements can play a secondary role in the formation of cataracts. Cataracts are formed when an opaque coating begins to form on the lens of your German Shepherd dog's eyes. These cataracts can impair your German Shepherd dog's ability to see if not surgically dealt with. German Shepherd dogs in particular have a propensity for developing “developmental” cataracts as puppies; these form often during the first four years of your German Shepherd dog's life. Pannus is a subset  of this illness, afflicting both cornea and conjunctiva of both eyes and can lead to blindness.

If your German Shepherd dog exhibits difficulty seeing, including unfocused vision or a habit of “bumping into” things while attempting to move around, or if you see what looks like opaque or even dark spots forming on your German Shepherd dog's eyes, then your dog is possibly developing symptoms of Pannus Cataracts. Congenital cataracts generally do not cause blindness, rather remaining as “blind spots,” while pannus, which develops later in life, is likely to lead to complete blindness if left untreated.

When it comes to cataracts, your best bet is using preventative care early on.  A proper diet of good nutrition, including feeding your German Shepherd dogs foods like wheat sprout powder and other antioxidants, helps to reduce risk of cataracts in older dogs. However, if your dog should develop cataracts, it is a relatively easy surgical procedure to treat them. The “Phacoemulsification” procedure uses high-frequency sound waves to destroy the initial lens. A suction device removes the former lens from the eye and replaces it with an artificial intraocular lens implant. The surgery takes an hour per eye and has a very high success rate.

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